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into a plane and it took an hour and a half to fled northampton to flood into the connecticut river. in the of the region's the 600 million gallons of water went through a williamsburg williamsburg, skinnerville and hated bill 15 minutes each. the worst industrial disaster at the time. over $1 million of property damage was sustained almost a hundred people left homeless and 139 were killed my input book is about the only village not be built skinnerville and william skinner. what set his story apart is the success and he achieved after the disaster. skinnerville had the worst destruction, it was obliterated from the face of the earth and a one. left, his house was the only one left standing and he lost more financially than any other individual he lost the equivalent of $35 million. he was ruined but because he made choices that nobody else would make he could come back. the other manufacturers in a the valley could not rebuild successfully. they had gone out of business, a bankruptcy, and sold businesses and left town. historian said three years later men of abundance could withst
, and the town took about an hour and a half to flood into the town and into the connecticut river. in the upper regions of the valley where the land is sweeper, that water went through the villages in about 15 minutes each. it resulted in the worst industrial disaster in american history at the time. over a million dollars worth of property damage was sustained, almost 800 people were left homeless x139 people -- and 139 people were killed. my book is about the only village that wasn't rebuilt, skinnerville. and the man at the center of that village, william skinner. and what sets skinner's story apart is the success he achieved after this disaster. now, skinnerville suffered the worst destruction of all. it was considered to have been obliterated from the face of the earth. there wasn't a brick left of skinner's mill, his house was very nearly the only one left standing, and he lost more financially than any other individual. in those 15 minutes, he lost the equivalent of $35 million. he was ruined. but because he was willing to make choices that no one else was willing to make, he was able to
independently across the colonies in connecticut and new york and pennsylvania and south carolina. and sam adams became the chief letter writer and political strategist and the story is told that a neighbor that had walked by his apartment at his house at 2:00 in the morning with see the light in his study up there and know that his pan was going scribble scroll trying to lead towards independence but sam adams really was, and of course he came along and did some remarkable things and even defended his wonderful biography and the british soldiers in the boston massacre because he believed that it was right a man of action and sam adams a man of principle. it was said of him she was the living embodiment of the principal. >> when my question is about the founding fathers. if you could go the way to pick one to go to the bar with which one would you go with and why? >> i will be honest with you. i think sam adams would be as important as he was because he didn't talk about anything but he believed in. i think i would probably pick somebody like cizik that had been he essentially a buccaneer, someb
, connecticut, 1837. c-span: what were his parents like? >> guest: his father was a very successful merchant, junius spencer morgan, who worked in hartford and then boston, and then moved to london in 1854 to become an anglo-american merchant banker. and he and pierpont, basically, were funneling european capital to the emerging american economy. i mean, we really were the emerging economy in the 19th century. he was very conservative, very upright, very much concerned to build an international banking dynasty that would rival the rothschilds and baring brothers, and he did. i mean, over the next 80 years, the morgan bank--especially in america--rothschild didn't really see what america was going to be. they had one man, august belmont, who was very good. but junius morgan staked the future on his son and on america. he was very, very supervisory and censorious and critical of his son, and determined that his son was going to be sort of an upright man with a solid-gold reputation. and pierpont was not--he was not following in the paternal footsteps early on. he was much more likely to take r
there connecticut or cyber. you have to know a lot about the client's business. you can't take the run of the mill lawyer and throw him in and expect him or her to do a good job i don't care how erudite they are if they don't really know how operations work and don't really know what the weapons capabilities are but the key here is the technologies need to assemble the facts and lawyers will provide the law and enter the process where you apply the facts as you do anything else in the practice of the law. i have never seen a situation where knowledgeable commanders really fought the law restrain them. secretary panetta talks about the rules of engagement, and part operational restraints and policy. i think my friend stuart, they dither over problems and most of them are lawyers but not practicing law and we need some decisive decisions, policy decisions. it is not the law or the lawyers per se. >> the last words as opposed to legal restraints. >> i agree with charlie. if you are a policymaker and you are not sure you have courage to make decisions about a particular issue the easiest thing in the
was in high school. the greenwich, connecticut newspaper. and he came back and went to work for the voice of america. but he very quickly was diverted to a new veterans organization. it is kind of an interesting story as well. it was integrated. >> the american legion? >> yes, that's right. the american legion. anyway, that kept him occupy for couple of years. and then he had publishing and at the end of his life was a freelance writer. he was a writer. the other two became an architect. he was a very good artist. he was an ornithologist and would draw pictures of birds. he became part of international affairs. so he was interested in politics all the way around. looking for the american government. those three were seriously injured in their time and north africa. which is, in a way, why they survived. >> rachel cox, this is her book, "into dust and fire: five young americans who went first to fight the nazis." she didn't want to give away too much of the ending, but just a little bit. rachel cox has another uncle who became rather notorious. >> archibald cox. everyone called him uncle b
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6